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  • Top 5 Commercial espresso machines

    Planning to buy a new Commercial Espresso machine for your shop? Confused by so many options? No need to worry anymore because we have compiled a list of commercial espresso machines which would be perfect for your business.

    We have reviewed these espresso machines on various factors and come up with these top Commercial Espresso Machines which would provide you with high-quality Espressos in just a few minutes.

    Breville 800ESXL 15-Bar Triple-Priming Die-Cast Espresso Machine

    Cost: $500

    One of the most popular and cheaper Espresso machines (top pick at Freshpresso) with its 15 bar Italian pumps, this one is perfect for those small budgeted cafés and can provide you with a mug of quality espresso in just a short time. It features a Thermoblock heating system and a purge function which helps in selecting the temperature for espresso extraction after it has been steamed thoroughly.

    It features Triple Prime Pump which helps in releasing 3 bursts of hot water which is used to moisten the grounds to extract the richest flavor from the ground coffee. Its 2.2L removable water tank makes it easier to clean and provide you with large amounts of espresso in just a short time.

    Gaggia 14101 Classic Espresso Machine

    Cost: $379

    One of the most chosen Espresso machines, this one comes with a 72-ounce removable water tank which makes it easier to brew espresso and then clean it later. This Best Selling model features chrome-plated brass portafilter and brew group which provides amazing heat stability while its user-friendly controls make it easier to use. Cuisinart DGB-900BC Grind & Brew Coffee Maker makes for a great alternative to the Gaggia 14101

    It comes with a Pannarello Steam Wand that helps in creating rich foam for various beverages and as it comes with both a commercialized and pressurized filter basket, it can easily satisfy the curiosity of both a beginner and an experienced coffee maker.

    Profitec Pro 700 Dual Boiler Espresso Machine

    Cost: $3100

    Although this Espresso Machine is a little costly, this machine with its dual boilers made of stainless steel which performs both steaming and brewing task are perfect for your advanced café and are bound to produce a barista quality espresso in no time.

    Its powerful RPM motor and its rotary pump which helps in connecting to a water source and cuts out the noise allows you to brew a large quantity of ground coffee with ease and make sure that you don’t need to wait for a new cycle of brewing as it keeps the machine heated. It doesn’t require you to do much and handles the whole process internally while providing you with consistent quality coffee.

    Breville BES920CBXL Dual Boiler Espresso Machine

    Cost: $1259

    One of the best Commercial Espresso Machine out there, this machine comes with dual stainless steel boilers and dual Italian pumps which let you extract and steam synchronously. Its boiler is PID temperature controlled which helps in providing precise temperature to make your perfect espresso while Over Pressure Valve(OPV) in your boils helps in limiting the maximum pressure through the whole extraction ensuring that your espresso doesn’t get a bitter taste.

    It is user-friendly and provides you all the information on its Backlit LCD while its Auto Start button helps in preheating the machine allowing you to brew multiple cups of espressos one after the other. It also features a descale alert and LCD assisted descale procedure which helps you while competing with other cafes.

    Jura IMPRESSA XJ9 Automatic Coffee Machine

    Cost: $3598

    One of the most costly Espresso Machines out there, this one is easier to use and produces a whole range of beverages with just one push of your finger. Its sleek, symmetrical design and its chrome-plated bean container with its silver finish make it a sight to behold and really popular among most cafés.

    With its 500g bean container and 4L water tank, you can easily brew a large amount of coffee at a time and with its fine foam technology, you can create a thick, creamy froth on your beverages providing them with an even higher-quality taste in just a few seconds.

  • Coffee Update #2 : How to clean a French press

    While French press coffee is easy to make, the same cannot be said for its cleaning. Ask anyone who owns a French Press and they will tell you how complicated and grueling it is to clean it. While Filter coffee makers are easy to clean as all you have to do is throw the used Filters and all the grounds, in French Press it is a little messier as all the wet, gritty grounds get accumulated in the bottom of the press.

    But don’t worry, here is a quick way to clean your French Press in no time ensuring that your next pot coffee tastes as amazing as your first.

    • Throw the used grounds

    This is one of the most obvious step and although there are many ways to do this, best way would be to collect your used grounds in a garbage can. If you throw the used grounds in your toilet or sink or garbage, it might get messy and it also might clog your sink or toilet. So make sure that you collect your used grounds in a garbage bag or can and then throw it out.

    How do you get all the used grounds out of the press? This is pretty simple, just tap the bottom of the press and hold it upside down over your garbage can. Most of the grounds will come out easy, but if it doesn’t you can use a spoon or a spatula to scoop it out of it. You can also pour some water into your press and then get all the grounds out of it and collect it in your garbage can.

    Once you have gotten rid of all the used grounds, you can move on to step 2 of cleaning your French Press.

    • Disassemble your French Press and Submerge it

    Now that your French Press is clean of all used grounds, time to remove the press components like plunger, lid, etc. and keep them separately inside a hot, soapy water. You can use either a dish soap or a baking soda to soak your coffee machine and although baking soda ensures that there is no change in the taste of brewed coffee after it is cleaned, there is no harm in using a dish soap too. Just make sure that you rinse your press thoroughly to remove any trace of soap from your press.

    You can also use some coffee machine cleaning powder as these help in removing the coffee oils left behind after each brew.

    • Scrub it completely

    Take a scrub and gently scrub the carafe and plunger and lid to clean them up thoroughly and use baking soda and water to achieve the desired results. Make sure you clean all the press components and scrub them clean for better results.

    • Wipe it dry

    Use a dish towel and wipe all the press components separately. Once you have completely dried them up, you can reassemble them together. You can now use your French Press to make yourself a delicious cup of coffee which will taste as good as your first cup of coffee and will consistently give you the same amazing taste.

  • Coffee Update #1: How to clean your Espresso Machine

    While you enjoy your Espresso coffee every day, it is crucial to keep in mind that your Espresso machine needs a regular clean up to get rid of all the milk and coffee residue which gets accumulated in your machine after every use. Although you might be rinsing your machine after every use, it is much more important to clean it properly every week to dissolve all the debris and residues.

    But how to keep your machine clean? Here are a few tips you should follow to keep your Espresso machine neat and clean.

    1. Clean your Espresso Machine after every use

    One of the most basic steps to follow is to rinse your Espresso machine and its equipment every time before and after you use it. You do not need to use a cleaning solution, just use hot, soapy water for a basic cleaning session.

    Wipe down the machine’s surface and clean any drips or stains near or on it. This will ensure you a clean work space and a somewhat clean machine’s inside too.

    1. Deep-Clean your Espresso Machine once every week

    Make sure that you perform a vigorous cleaning session on your Espresso Machine once in every week. Sometimes oil grease, mineral deposits, milk proteins, etc. get stuck to the machine and might affect the working of your machine. In such cases, it is good to use a cleaning solution to clean your machine properly every week.

    If you leave the deep cleaning for a long time, it would take you double the initial time to completely clean your Espresso Machine. So do perform this activity every week.

    1. Use a scrub or brush

    If you want to make sure that your machine is cleaned properly and quickly, it would be advisable to buy an Espresso machine cleaning brush for the same. These brushes will help you in a vigorous cleaning of the machine and will make the whole process faster.

    You can use a group head brush with a 90-degree angle as this brush will be sure to reach all the cracks and nooks of the machines.

    1. Descale your machine with a vinegar solution

    Sometimes due to the usage of impure water, mineral deposits form on the machine in the form of limescales. These limescales may interrupt the working of your Espresso machine or could clog the coffee output part which would result in the machine not working or providing you with little drips of coffee.

    This deposition has been known to create a lot of problems for your machine and is found best to be removed as soon as possible. You can use a vinegar and hot water solution to remove the limescale and clean your machine. Vinegar has been found effective in dissolving limescale quickly, leaving a smooth surface behind it.

    1. Disassemble all the removable parts and clean them

    When you are cleaning your Espresso machine, make sure you clean and wipe every nook and cranny. Ensure that you detach all the removable parts and clean them separately. Once you have cleaned the machine and its parts, you can fix them back together and start using your machine again.

  • TRAVEL UPDATE #2: BURYAT CUISINE

    Baikal (above) really is the pearl of Siberia, the world’s largest lake and a UNESCO world heritage site. However, it was mostly too cold to enjoy the time we were there. Apparently, it’s still early in the season. After spending several weeks in and around Lake Baikal, I had enough opportunities to sufficiently try out Buryat cuisine as well as learn about some of the history behind it. All cuisines reflect the culture where it originates, whether it is in the choice of ingredients, prevalence of certain cooking styles and influx of foreign cuisines.

    Today the Buryats (above) are a minority in Russia and Mongolia, however, they are also the largest indigenous group in Siberia, mainly concentrated in the Buryat Republic in and around Lake Baikal, which are all part of the Russian Federation. The capital of the Buryat Republic, Ulan-Ude, is where I spent the majority of time during traveling. Traditionally, the Buryats, like the Mongols, were nomadic and lived in traditional yurts. The yurt is a special kind of tent that can be assembled and disassembled in an hour, keeps internal temperatures warm in winter and cool in summer. The yurts are circular and each place in the yurt has a specific purpose. There’s a hole in the centre of the roof to allow for venting.

    TRAVEL UPDATE #2: BURYAT CUISINE

    I’m back in Canada after five weeks of travelling that flew by.  At one point I was flying to Russia and it seemed like the next day that I was already leaving. Time just goes quickly when you enjoy everyday. It’s a very tangible feeling. Anyways, over the next couple of weeks I will finish a series of posts related to the trip. Access to the internet became pretty spotty while traveling, plus admittedly, what I needed more than anything was a break.

    Baikal (above) really is the pearl of Siberia, the world’s largest lake and a UNESCO world heritage site. However, it was mostly too cold to enjoy the time we were there. Apparently, it’s still early in the season. After spending several weeks in and around Lake Baikal, I had enough opportunities to sufficiently try out Buryat cuisine as well as learn about some of the history behind it. All cuisines reflect the culture where it originates, whether it is in the choice of ingredients, prevalence of certain cooking styles and influx of foreign cuisines.

    Today the Buryats (above) are a minority in Russia and Mongolia, however, they are also the largest indigenous group in Siberia, mainly concentrated in the Buryat Republic in and around Lake Baikal, which are all part of the Russian Federation. The capital of the Buryat Republic, Ulan-Ude, is where I spent the majority of time during traveling. Traditionally, the Buryats, like the Mongols, were nomadic and lived in traditional yurts. The yurt is a special kind of tent that can be assembled and disassembled in an hour, keeps internal temperatures warm in winter and cool in summer. The yurts are circular and each place in the yurt has a specific purpose. There’s a hole in the centre of the roof to allow for venting.

    In Mongolia today, many people still live in yurts (called “gers” there), however, they have been supplemented with SUVs and satellite TV. In Buryatia, however, as a result of Sovietization and the tragic history of the 20th century, tribes were forcibly settled, many lost their lives in a struggle for maintaining their identity and many emigrated.

    I went on a mission to find a book of Buryat recipes to replicate the most well-known Buryat dish of buuza / бууза, which are large steamed meat dumplings (called pozy / позы in Russian).  You will find the same dumplings in Mongolia as well as throughout Central Asia with the addition of some vegetables which changes the texture (manty / манты).  The only books I could locate on Buryat cuisine in the entire city of Ulan-Ude were housed in the National Library Rare Books Collection.  That’s right, there aren’t any books in Russian much less English featuring Buryat recipes.

    Luckily, as is a general theme throughout modern Russia, the internet fills a void where political control and interests cannot fully eradicate. And in my research I found numerous recipes for buuzy (none of which have been translated that I could find). How exciting it is to stumble upon something that isn’t on the internet!  Well, it will be now, stay tuned for a future update when I attempt to replicate these in my kitchen.

  • TRAVEL UPDATE #1: GREETINGS FROM ULAN-UDE

    Friday June 7 already feels like it was a month ago, but that was the day that I began travelling from Toronto to Moscow. I arrived in Moscow late Saturday night and was met by two dear friends after I disembarked from the train from the airport.

    I had all of one day to get reacquainted with the city I used to live in.  In many ways, I didn’t recognize it at all. And much of the feelings were overwhelming and difficult to process in so short a period of time while also being jet lagged, tired, cranky and a little paranoid. In some ways Moscow was unrecognizable. In other ways it very much reinforced the perception I’ve always had of it.

    Our train left Moscow last Monday and arrived in Ulan-Ude late Thursday night on Moscow time. Local time was already early Friday morning. We tried the onboard restaurant but found the food largely inedible. For example, here is a mystery beef dish that we were served.

    I can’t believe that already a week has passed by since we first arrived in Ulan-Ude. We made preparations for our journey to Mongolia next Friday.

    ULAN-UDE HIGHLIGHTS RESTAURANT LIFE

    Because we don’t have a kitchen, I’ve had the pleasure of eating out in at least one restaurant everyday.  And one restaurant in particular: Travelers Coffee, which is a chain of cafe/bistro type restaurants across Russia. The branding is modern, the choices are modern and the variety of coffee is the most I’ve seen ever in this country.  I did find a better Americano at Marco Polo but the atmosphere, location and menu choices of Travelers make it hands down a better choice for us.  My favourite meal because of the value for money you get (I’m so American sometimes) is the club sandwich, which for 239 rubles ($7) you get 400 grams of food (almost a pound)–a big sandwich and french fries. And they put a ton of dill on the french fries, I don’t think it adds anything to.